Employee Retention: Communicate to Retain

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Employee Retention: Communicate to Retain

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Assessment

Employee retention relies heavily on how well an employee can do a job, inter-company relations and how efficient and purposeful the work is. Being competitive and offering great packages helps employee retention, as does rewards, recognition, training programs and a good hiring process. However, many of these things count on good communication skills to succeed.

Below are a few communication strategies to inspire effective communication throughout all organization levels.

Keep Employees Informed

Provide regular and ongoing communication throughout the entire organization. Regular communication gives employees an idea of when to expect feedback or new information, and through which communication channels.

Routine feedback will also help employees gauge their success and adjust their behaviors. Communicate their strengths, weaknesses, goals, responsibilities and options for improvement every few months so employees know whether standards are being met.

Ask for Feedback

Ask for employee input to create a company culture that encourages independent thinking and values employee opinions. Employees have unique insight on the business processes because they interact first hand with your customers and company systems. It’s especially important to request feedback with decisions that affect them, such as new policies.

Find Different Ways to Discover Their Opinions

In addition to asking for feedback at quarterly reviews or meetings, you can also use assessments and surveys to identify turnover in your organization. Host surveys, small group interviews, focus groups, exit interviews and online questionnaires to find out why your best employees stay with you and why some leave. Once you have the information to act on, you can begin taking measures to improve employee retention.

Deliver Relevant Messages to the Right Audiences

There is some information that your entire company would appreciate, such as an internal newsletter of upcoming events and holidays, or a quick email about something important happening in the office (ie. construction, power outage, etc.). However, not all information will be important or helpful to all employees, so consider your message and audience before you try to communicate. Don’t clutter your employees’ inboxes with unnecessary emails, and be sure to only send relevant, important information. If you send unimportant information too often, your employees may begin to ignore even the important messages.

Use the Right Medium

Different employees prefer to communicate in different ways. Consider using different mediums to communicate and if possible meet them where they prefer to discuss. For example, if a employees prefer SMS for quick messages, invest in an unlimited messaging plan. If you work with a freelancer who prefers email over anything else, communicate via email. Establish what communication resources your organization has and identify the best internal audiences to reach with them.


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