Category Archives: Culture

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7 Ways Employers Can Reduce Stress In The Workplace

What are the Effects of Work Stress?

Work-related stress occurs when an employee’s demands at work exceed how much they are able to cope with.

Research shows that 83% of workers in the US suffer from work-related stress. If left untreated, work stress can have serious mental, physical and emotional effects for employees.

The effects of stress include:

  • Feeling overwhelmed and unable to cope with workload
  • Feeling depressed
  • Feeling anxious (especially in regards to work)
  • Lacking energy and feeling tired
  • Headaches
  • Chest pains or chest tightness
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Drinking alcohol, smoking or other negative coping mechanisms

Workplace stress can also be a burden for your company. Work stress can lead to a drop in productivity and performance, increased employee sick leave or resignation and can end up costing your company a significant amount of money.

As an employer, it is your responsibility to make sure your employees are happy, healthy and stress-free at work. Ensuring your employees are free from stress will have positive benefits for the success of your team and company. This article highlights seven ways employers can reduce stress in the workplace.

7 Ways You Can Reduce Stress In The Workplace

1. Help Employees Manage Their Workload

Juggling lots of tasks, wearing lots of hats and working non-stop can wear down your employees. Your employees need to be able to effectively manage their workload, otherwise they will burnout and suffer from work-related stress.

You can help employees balance their workload by fairly distributing the workload among the team and frequently checking in with your team members to see how they are progressing with their workload. Make sure you offer reasonable work shifts and ensure employees have enough time to rest in between shifts and don’t work too many hours at once.

2. Better Understand Your Team With Employee Assessments

Using employee emotional and personality assessments like the Everything DiSC assessment, you can better understand your employees and how to improve your workplace to suit their needs, personality and learning type.

Employee assessments allow you to learn which communication and management strategies work best for each of your employees. By being able to tailor your management style to the people you are dealing with, you can improve the working relationship and help combat stress in the workplace.

3. Improve Communications At Work

Communication plays a crucial role at work. When employees are able to effectively and positively communicate with their co-workers and managers, it increases performance and reduces work-related stress.

If you don’t already, schedule weekly meetings with your team so you can share ideas, work-wins, updates and feedback. Giving your employees a chance to speak up and be heard can work wonders for employee wellbeing.

Other ways to improve communication at work include encouraging open communication, keeping employees updated about organizational changes, having one-to-one employee reviews and asking your employees for feedback.

Non-verbal communication is always important for managers and employers to master. Your body language can have a huge impact on your employees and co-workers so be sure to communicate with positive, open and approachable body language.

4. Make Wellness a Part of Work Culture

There’s no denying that small changes like exercising more or eating healthily can reduce stress. By introducing various wellness programs into your work culture, you can help resolve stress in the workplace by making your worksite a happy, healthy place to be.

As an employer, you could offer employees a free/discounted gym membership as a work perk or host weekly yoga sessions in the office to help get those endorphins flowing. By hosting weekly yoga or meditation sessions you can encourage employees to embrace mindfulness which, in turn, can help reduce stress.

You can easily promote healthy living habits at work by providing free healthy snacks in the break room and by encouraging employees to take regular breaks, get away from their work station and stretch their legs. A 10-minute break can decrease stress, encourage productivity and improve work performance.

5. Recognise Your Employees Contributions and Successes

When employees feel valued at work, it can reduce their likelihood of work-related stress. Job security can play a huge role in workplace stress. So, it’s important to communicate with your employees that they are a valuable member of the team.

By recognising your employees specific contributions and successes in the workplace, you can improve their morale and make them feel like a valued part of the team. Offer employee incentives for reaching milestones, have an employee recognition board or employee-of-the-month program and congratulate them when they do a good job, no matter how small. Showing employees that you value their contribution will help reduce work stress and increase work morale.

6. Offer Flexi-Time and Remote Working Options

By having control over their work schedule and being able to fit work around other life commitments, remote working and flexi-time can reduce employee stress levels.

We know that remote working doesn’t suit all industries or businesses. However, if your company is capable of offering employees the chance to work remotely, it can really help to boost employee positivity.

Offering flexi-time or remote working options has been proven successful at increasing company morale and profitability. It’s a great way to combat workplace stress and allow your employees to have improved work-life balance.

7. Effectively Resolve Workplace Conflicts

Whether you manage a small close-knit team or a large-scale business, conflict at work is inevitable due to people having different personalities or opinions. Effective employers are able to take workplace conflicts or disagreements into opportunities for growth and development.

Resolving workplace conflict will encourage a supportive, productive workplace and reduce employee stress, absenteeism and future conflict.

You can use employment assessment solutions to understand the causes of workplace conflict and how to effectively implement a conflict management strategy to provide conflicts from escalating and negatively impacting on your organization.

As you can see, there are a number of steps employers can take to help reduce stress in the workplace. It’s important to have a strong, supportive employee network and to offer your employees a comfortable, positive working environment. There are many benefits to reducing stress in the workplace.

To better understand your employees and how you can tailor your work environment to reduce employee stress, talk to us today to learn more about the employee assessment solutions we offer.


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How to look after your employees’ mental health

This is a guest post from Alicia Christine. Alicia is a human resource professional with expertise in employee experience and wellness. She writes for BestTechie and Techie Doodlers, and shares how businesses can be better to maximize their potential of helping better their communities and society as a whole. Find her on LinkedIn.

The discussion about employee wellness and mental health is becoming more and more important all over Asia. In fact, the Department of Labor and Employment in the Philippines issued guidelines for employers on how to ensure good mental health and well-being in the workplace just last February. This is in line with the spread of the occupational phenomenon known as burnout.

The World Health Organization defines burnout as a syndrome resulting from chronic workplace stress that has not been successfully managed. This often results in exhausted workers, reduced productivity, and an increasing apathetic attitude towards one’s job. Now, what do you do if you’ve been noticing the same things with your employees in the workplace?

Don’t fret, you can still turn all of this around. Read on to know more about how to look after your employees’ mental well-being.

Open Up the Discussion on Mental Health in the Workplace

One of the best things you can do to address mental health issues is to provide an environment that is open and receptive to your employees’ struggles. In most cases, employees will never come out and discuss these issues with their employers, as they may be seen as a liability to the company. This will then lead to the problem worsening and negatively affecting both the employee and the company as a whole.

One way you can address this is by opening up the conversation on mental health. This proactive approach to employee wellness will certainly improve the way your workplace handles these issues. A great way to do this would be to educate your managers, team leaders, and supervisors on mental health issues through seminars held by professionals. This way they’ll be able to determine the signs of mental health issues and address them appropriately.

Promote Work-Life Balance

Another thing that’ll go a long way in promoting a healthy workplace is a focus on work-life balance for your employees. The thing we have to remember here is that employees that are physically and mentally healthy tend to work better than those who are not. So while it may seem wise to praise employees that overwork themselves, it may eventually lead to their undoing due to burnout.

So how do you promote work-life balance in the workplace? Well, one thing you can try is a flexible work arrangement. Pain Free Working highlights how flexible work hours allow employees to live more well-rounded lives. They’ll come to work, execute, and then will be free to do whatever they want with their spare time. This will do wonders for their mental health, as they’ll have more time to invest in other things aside from work. In turn, this makes them more productive as they’ll come back to the workplace fresh and recharged making this a true win-win situation.

Bots for Mental Health

Lastly, another way you can push for an overall improvement in your employees’ mental health is through the use of the right technology. Technology has often bridged the gap between society and its needs, and mental health is no exception. Various apps have sprung from the growing mental health crisis that, for the most part, have done an adequate job of curbing the issue.

In the corporate setting, one piece of technology has been surprisingly effective. Fast Company highlights how the use of chatbots make it easier for employees to talk about their issues. This is mainly because the AI is geared towards addressing these issues. Couple this with the fact that the discretion that comes with talking to someone who isn’t a person and you’ll find that you’ve created a safe space for your employees.

Make Use of Assessments

Lastly, one thing that you have to consider when things are going awry is if your employees are in the right roles. While it’s easy to put the blame on the employees or the systems that you’ve put in place, sometimes it’s really just a matter of whether or not something is the right fit. Inc highlights how being in the wrong role often leads to disengaged employees.

One way you can alleviate this problem is through the use of assessment tests. These will give you a good grasp on whether or not someone is in the right role by seeing if their skills and personality are up to par with their current role in your team. Another way to do this would be to just ask your employees whether or not they think their current role is right for them.

If you want to learn more about how to make your workplace one that values mental health and safety, check out this article on 5 Ways to Deal with Workplace Conflict!


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5 Ways to deal with conflict in the workplace

This is a guest post from Jamie Costello. Jamie is a legal assistant based in Manchester, UK. The topics he writes about varies from business law to dispute resolution. He uses his knowledge from education and working alongside internal commercial litigations solicitors within his role to help collate his articles.

Tension in the workplace is not avoidable. Even in the best cultures, the best teams and even in the happiest office, you will find some form of conflict is unavoidable.

And an office conflict can lead to a lot of bad things for your business;

  • Loss of productivity
  • Loss of motivation
  • Absence
  • Reduced teamwork
  • Poorer work quality

So, as a leader in a workplace it is important to deal with conflict in a set way, which can include some of the following tactics.

5 Ways to deal with workplace conflict

1) Timing

Stepping in and dealing with conflict successfully relies on several factors, not least of which is timing. Leave an issue too long and it can fester; becoming almost impossible to resolve. As a leader, your responsibility is to step in at just the right time to avoid any ongoing issues.

Don’t move into the situation, taking sides and backing one claim over the other without hard evidence by any means. But, it is important that you step in and let both sides know you are dealing with the issue. The outcome won’t be clear at this point, but it does showcase that you are dealing with the issue promptly.

2) Establish Boundaries

Conflict can quickly become unmanageable if both parties refuse to a level of civility. Whatever the issue, it is your responsibility as a leader to establish what each party’s boundaries are during the conflict and ensure they are respected.

In most workplaces, complete avoidance is unavoidable/not practical. But you should be able to establish a basic framework to ensure work can still be done even during the conflict.

3) Confront Issues, Don’t Ignore

One of the biggest failures of a leader during workplace conflict is to ignore the fact that it is happening. Burying your head in the sand may make your Monday morning easier, but it will lose you both employees as well.

If you ignore a conflict between your employees their work can deteriorate, tensions can make their working relationship irreparable, and you may ultimately lose them both. And the blame may be laid at your feet to boot. Primarily, for failing to deal with or acknowledge that there was a problem to begin with.

A good leader needs to understand conflict is natural and work to ensure it has no long-lasting effect, not dismiss it entirely.

4) Mediate

One of the easiest ways to ensure you deal with a conflict is to mediate between the two parties. Having an open, frank, discussion of the issue and what went wrong can be incredibly important–and resolve the issue much better than most other methods.

Of course, if an issue has developed so far that people are too angry to talk civilly during mediation it can be a real issue. At this point, you may need to actively consider a way to solve the solution by moving/transferring employees where appropriate.

Or, if a party is actively causing the issue and there is hard evidence, then termination may be appropriate in some cases. The fact of the matter is that you have to attempt the mediate and then solve the issue if it presents itself.

5) Listen

The worst thing you can do as a leader during a conflict is to fail at listening. It teaches those under you that you don’t care, even when in most cases you probably care too much. So it’s important to ensure that at the very least you are proving that you care about the situation and how everyone is handling it in that sense.

Listening is one of the key steps to ensuring that you have the respect and understanding of your staff. So, make sure that you have an ear available for any situation.

Overall Thoughts

Conflict is a normal part of everyday life. We have conflicts as part of every life and it is hard to avoid, even in the workplace. The fact of the matter is that as a leader, you need to effectively manage and understand conflicts in your team.

Listen, manage and resolve the issues. That way, you can keep your team in place, hopefully, without any long-standing issues. And you then can continue to resolve similar issues in the same way.


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A guide to professional office communications

Every person understands the power of efficient communication and its impact on daily life and processes. The quality of communication impacts how well we resolve issues, establish relationships, network, and fit in the surrounding societies.

At work, communication not only impacts the well-being of the employees but directly affects the quality of work. If people are stressed, annoyed, or even scared to speak their minds out, that will inevitably lead to poor performance, frequent errors, and a high level of employee turnover.

So what should every employee know about professional communication? Here’s a quick overview that covers the key areas of office communication in a little more detail.

Personal communication

In the office, people interact with dozens (if not hundreds) of colleagues on a regular basis. In order for these interactions to be valuable and with no interference in the actual work process, it is important that all employees know the basic communication principles.

Watch the body language

Even though we are not always aware of our body language, we need to pay attention to it as it impacts the way people perceive us. A person with crossed arms and tense posture seems much more distant and negative than a relaxed person who looks you in the eyes and smiles.

Some of the basic areas to keep in mind when talking to colleagues are:

  • Maintain the eye contact but don’t turn it into a “dead stare”
  • Smile!
  • Try not crossing arms
  • Look at the person, not at your mobile phone or tablet during the talk

Another important thing that needs to be addressed is over-familiarity. Some enthusiastic employees constantly hug their colleagues, tap them on either shoulders or back, shake hands, and overall, get too close to someone’s comfort zone. Such behavior is often uncomfortable, intimidating or annoying so the best option is to restrain from it, except for when talking to close friends or people who do not mind it.

Listen, then talk

Listening is an obligatory skill for efficient communication. Busy office life often implies rush and people try to express themselves as fast as possible in order to be heard and understood.

However, by listening to the other person without interrupting or hurrying them is a sign of great respect and professionalism. It shows that you value the opinion of your colleague and are willing to hear it.

Use your body language to show that you really listen to a person: react to their words, mimic some of their gestures (it helps win them round) and watch the facial expression (it should not be deadpan).

The biggest things to watch for during a personal conversation with a colleague:

  • interruption
  • pointless arguing
  • dishonesty
  • deadpan face
  • crossed arms and tense posture

Phone calling

Another frequent form of communication that we often see in the offices is phone calls. When you need to reach someone really fast or urgently solve a certain task, the best way to do so is to call a person. Though seemingly easy, there are still certain rules to follow when making phone calls.

First, always introduce yourself. There might be hundreds of people working in your company and most people don’t even know the people who work on the same floor but in a different department. Therefore, at the beginning of the conversation, introduce yourself and clarify which department you work in.

Second, clearly state the reason why you call and never hesitate to ask for clarification in case you did not understand the person very well. It’s better to clarify the issue once then resolving possible issues in the future. Another good idea would be to take notes during the call to ensure no important information is missed.

Finally, thank the person for their time when ending the call – this will show that you treat your colleagues with respect and value their time.

Remember: your colleagues are people who work on the same goal as you do which is contributing to the company’s development and growth. So one should invest in nurturing good communication skills so it will bring benefits in the future.

Written communication

Most of the in-office communication happens via texts, emails, or chats. So it’s important to know the basic rules of professional communication via the messengers in order to never miss the important information and get heard in return.

Emails

Emails are great because they allow you to share information with different people, exchange documents, schedule meetings and pretty much organize and manage most of the internal processes.

At the same time, emails are often neglected, ignored, deleted, or lost – simply because the sender did not care much about crafting a professional email. Here are the essentials of a good email:

  • Informative and clear subject: a receiver should immediately understand what the email is about from its subject.
  • A well-balanced copy: not too short but not too long either. Write all the needed information and any useful comments.
  • No misuse of emojis, GIFs, memes, etc. Keep the email professional.
  • Appropriate tone: start with a salutation and end the email with a professional signature (i.e. “Best regards”). Do not use slang or jargon in the email.

The problem of many emails is that the sender does not know how to create a professional and informative email. As a result, the email looks more like a message from a social media that was sent to a friend but not to a colleague.

Work chats

Different companies use different messengers and project chats, with Slack, Trello, and Skype being the most popular ones. The cornerstone of professional communication in such messengers is respect for your colleagues and an ability to listen without interrupting.

Remember: there should be absolutely no harassment, jargon, or inappropriate wording in all forms of written communication in the office. As well, always remember to address the person you are talking to, thank them for their time and provide as much information as needed.

Final word

The topic of professional communication is really vast and specific to every company. What we can say is that the efficiency and quality of office communication between the employees heavily depend on the internal company culture.

If a company has well-established culture, based on mutual respect and trust, there will be no or very little issues related to communication. Thus, while optimizing the quality of communication in your office and educating people about it, take some time to work on the internal culture as well.


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Quantifying the Unquantifiable: The Low Down on Soft Skills

This is a guest post from Sophie J. Parker. Sophie blogs over at Surehand, where industrial safety professionals can find their perfect job. It is her aim to help create a safer world, one inspector at a time.

There’s a piece of advice anyone who’s ever looked for work or a promotion has heard at some point.

Develop your soft skills.

Soft skills are skills that enable you to succeed in a range of environments. They include personality traits and attributes, people skills, social skills and more.

Soft skills have slowly risen from accessory ornaments at the end of a great CV to prominence. Changes in the way markets and companies operate in the digital age made non-technical skills crucial.

As fields are taken over by new ways of operating, many technical qualifications are now obsolete. Adaptability, creativity, and willingness to learn went from perks to requisites for survival in ever-evolving markets.

Now, soft skills are at the forefront of requirements for many new positions and divisions. The professional profile companies seek to fill is increasingly centered on these skills.

In a few decades, “develop your soft skills” went from generic advice to thoughtful counsel. In this article, we’ll go over the reasons these skills are in such demand.

We’ll also list the most popular soft skills for employers in 2020. Finally, we’ll discuss some of the metrics available to measure these skills in the workplace.

Soft Skills In Hard Markets

Soft vs Hard Skills: Old School Wisdom

Traditionally, soft skills were considered more as perks than prerequisites. These skills were considered inherently unmeasurable. Hard skills could be trained and measured.

To the first generations of management thinkers, hard skills seemed like a better horse to bet on. Time wound up proving them very wrong.

Hard skills may have been easier to measure, but they also proved more rigid. Specializing in hard skills made workers harder to adapt to new positions.

This would be a crucial shortcoming.

The Age of Disruption

As technological advancements have continued relentlessly, many markets were deeply disrupted. Whole industries rose out of seemingly nowhere.

Many roles and departments that are vital today didn’t exist a decade or two ago. Companies struggle to find professionals to perform at a high level in novel fields.

Both market disruptors and well-established companies see their hierarchies affected. Startups and large players have different priorities, but both require soft skills.

Different Priorities

Startups need to hire people that have the hard skills they need at the moment. At the same time, they need employees with the non-technical skills required to handle growth down the road.

Hard skills put food on the table, but it’s soft skills that keep that table getting bigger. Soft skills in your staff mean that a better workplace culture can flourish. This, in turn, leads to companies that grow sustainably, with higher rates of productivity.

Then, there are the big players. Well-established market titans that put too much stock in hard skills become sluggish.

Social and communication skills allow key staff to develop inter-departmental synergy. Understanding the human factor makes it easier for large companies to react to disruption.

Soft Skill Metrics

The key drawback to soft skills is the lack of data to measure their effectiveness in any given situation. Or so the conventional wisdom goes. That statement may have been a fact decades ago, but social sciences have come a long way since then.

Qualitative methodologies have been refined by social psychologists, sociologists, and other experts. Decades of research have developed an ample array of tools to measure non-technical skills. Their accuracy and predictive power are now settled matters in academia.

The ivory towers of academia are far removed from the gritty world of business, though. Distilled techniques in controlled settings are one thing; effective workplace metrics are another. Can these methods be used in a real-world workplace, fruitfully?

The answer is a resounding yes. Here are just a few ways to do it.

Behavioral interviewing

Behavioral interviews focus on the way candidates act in situations. Rather than current or past performance, they use hypotheticals to identify specific skills.

Soft skills-based rubrics

Rubrics are grid-based tools that feature key criteria for employee performance. They allow assessment and scoring on a number of attributes and scales. They should be customized for every role in the company.

Feedback surveys

Questionnaires and surveys can help identify issues stemming from non-technical skill scarcity. Falling levels of employee satisfaction, communication problems and leadership issues are well-captured by questionnaires.

Surveys are also crucial to measure how effective skill training is. Without feedback from colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, and clients it’s impossible to track progress.

Most Valued Soft Skills

Times are changing, especially in the corporate land. As science begins to catch up to the realities of non-technical skills, companies are wising up.

Recruiters now seek and weed out candidates based on their non-technical skills, or lack thereof. The following are the five most in-demand soft skills companies are looking for right now.

5. Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence is the capacity to accurately identify emotions in yourself and others. It is the non-technical skill’s jack-of-all-trades. It works as a bedrock upon which all other skills can be built.

Its presence is insufficient to determine that a candidate is most desirable. Its absence is a red flag, though. Companies need people capable of maturity and empathy.

4. Adaptability

Adaptability is the capacity to change one’s behavior and assumptions in a fast and fluid way. In the age of disruption, adaptability is just what the doctor prescribed. Companies need employees who can adjust to new realities without skipping a beat.

Adaptability doesn’t fall squarely on the shoulders of employees, though. There is a lot that an organization can do (or fail to do) to foster or hinder adaptability.

3. Collaboration

Companies have staked a lot on creating competitiveness between coworkers. It’s collaboration, however, that has proven to be the superior skill.

Companies are built on collaboration. The capacity to cooperate seamlessly in different settings and groups is invaluable to success.

2. Persuasion

Long-considered a skill for the sales team, persuasion has a far wider reach. It’s a crucial element in effective leadership.

Great leaders must be capable of persuading their teams to follow them. Dissent is natural and healthy, but a persuasive leader fosters cohesion.

1. Creativity

Creativity is the most sought-after soft skill in new hires this year. There’s a reason for that. In an uncertain, disrupted marketplace, companies know they’ll need to get innovative to beat the competition.. Creative employees approach problems from new angles, finding clever solutions to vexing puzzles.

This trend is likely to grow more pronounced in the coming years. Technology is taking over most job functions requiring high-level hard skills. Creative employees will allow companies to implement these technologies in new and amazing ways.

Conclusion

Soft skills have reversed the tables on a decades-old narrative. Long-relegated to a minor footnote, these skills are now one of the hottest commodities.

The progress of science allows companies to measure those skills, and analyze them. For companies that have, the verdict is clear—the value of non-technical skills is a hard fact.

Companies that create a culture with soft skills at the center face considerable gains. Those that don’t may well go the way of the dodo.


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Taking Team Dynamics into Account During the Recruitment Process

Hiring often looks simple from the outside. An inside look shows a process complex enough to have thousands of studies dedicated to single aspects of recruitment. Companies spend millions on assessing, training, and hiring the right people to drive their companies, and for good reason. The right people can make or break a business.

People-fit is a crucial topic, and one that many companies don’t spend enough time on. Today, the lens of hiring is slowly shifting to look at aspects such as personality, behavior, and beliefs to create teams that truly work together.

Team dynamics are an incredibly important consideration, because they affect not just how one person works, but how an entire team will get along and work together.

Personality Type

Personality type is the first and one of the most important things to measure. In most cases, you should use personality assessments during initial employee screening. This can include something like Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or another type of test. Competency and behavioral assessments are important as well, because they indicate what a person can do, why they would or would not do that, and how they do it.

Understanding personality type and behavior is key for determining where someone fits into a team. However, it’s equally crucial to have this information regarding existing team members.

Mapping Team Roles

Mapping team roles allows you to picture what you have in your team and then work to fill gaps. Various tools, typically models and frameworks, exist to help you do this. Look at assessments that can map out roles in successful teams, and the types of people who fit those roles. Your assessment provider should be able to assess multiple roles per individual, as there isn’t a one-size-fits-all for any candidate. That way, you can also keep your teams small with 3-5 people, and at the same time have every role filled (since each individual would be suited for multiple roles).

Cultural Diversity

Cultural diversity is the concept of having a range of influences and background in a team. This allows individuals to influence, challenge, and push each other to excel in ways they wouldn’t on their own. Cultural diversity can be achieved by hiring diverse people, by building cross-functional teams, and by tearing down silos so that teams can work together and be exposed to new ideas, ways of thinking, and approaches.

Cognitive Diversity

Cognitive diversity, like cultural diversity, is about creating teams stemming from different backgrounds, with different thought processes, and different levels of education. This involves understanding how people work, how they use existing knowledge versus creating their own, and whether they tend to use their own expertise or leverage that of others. Strong teams require a mix of cognitive approaches.

Team Compatibility

While it’s important to introduce diversity, you also have to pay attention to compatibility. You don’t want everyone on the team to be the same, but you also don’t want people who will naturally clash. Understanding how different types of people work together (and don’t), will allow you to make better decisions. Diversity for the sake of diversity benefits no one when it means individuals cannot work together.

Strong team are composed of diverse individuals, typically with a range of backgrounds, cultures, and cognitive methods. Most also require a set number of skills such as a specialist, coordinator, and implementer to actually be productive. Understanding each team, who is on that team, and what they need to be most productive will help you to find and fit candidates into those roles to enhance the team.


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