Induction Crisis (part 1) – The Heel of the Recruitment Achilles

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Induction Crisis (part 1) – The Heel of the Recruitment Achilles

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By Matylda Rabczenko
Guest Writer, Warwick Business School

During the hunt for capable employees, managers often over-invest into recruitment and selection alone, whilst forgetting about the last pillar to successfully obtaining medium to long-term workers: induction.

Simplistically speaking, induction can be considered as a process of integrating new employees into an organization and familiarizing them with the job requirements, but in reality it is more complex than it sounds. According to Rice, et al.’s (1950) 3 stages to become a true employee, ‘induction crisis’ (the first of the three) is the most problematic and bares the greatest number of casualties; the crisis occurs when an employee fails to adjust to the organization and makes the decision to resign.

Decades of studies, beginning in the 1950s, have confirmed a strong link between inadequate induction and high turnover rates amongst new recruits. Usually, the crisis can take place as soon as within the first 6 weeks of employment; some leave immediately, others postpone taking action by a year or more.

Before considering solutions, it is crucial to take into account what drives this HR failure. Here are a few common sources (a detailed description can be found in Skeats’ 1991 book on Successful Induction, which I would recommend as an initial guide!).

False expectations. These can be usually attributed to over-selling the position during the recruitment process, as well as misunderstandings about salaries and promotions. Induction may help in counteracting the overselling and depicting the reality of the job.

Company style. Although the company style is conveyed through advertisements, company websites, etc., the true company style and culture may come as a surprise to some new employees. Induction provides you with a good opportunity to give the new recruit a preview of the way in which people operate within your company.

Demands of the job. It is often not just the company that over-sells the position, but also the employee him/herself. Consequentially, the employee may become overwhelmed by his/her new responsibilities. Similarly, an employer may hire someone who is overqualified for a role and will find it boring. Induction allows you to have an exchange of expectations with the new employee, which may on occasion result in re-assignment to a more suitable role.

Difficulty with colleagues. Clashes with fellow co-workers are especially likely to occur when the new employees are thrown into a workplace environment without previously interacting with one another. In this case, induction can be a great opportunity for your new employees to socialize in a more informal setting.

Keep following our blog for the part 2 discussion including tips for success and conclusions!


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