Category Archives: Recruitment

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Quantifying the Unquantifiable: The Low Down on Soft Skills

This is a guest post from Sophie J. Parker. Sophie blogs over at Surehand, where industrial safety professionals can find their perfect job. It is her aim to help create a safer world, one inspector at a time.

There’s a piece of advice anyone who’s ever looked for work or a promotion has heard at some point.

Develop your soft skills.

Soft skills are skills that enable you to succeed in a range of environments. They include personality traits and attributes, people skills, social skills and more.

Soft skills have slowly risen from accessory ornaments at the end of a great CV to prominence. Changes in the way markets and companies operate in the digital age made non-technical skills crucial.

As fields are taken over by new ways of operating, many technical qualifications are now obsolete. Adaptability, creativity, and willingness to learn went from perks to requisites for survival in ever-evolving markets.

Now, soft skills are at the forefront of requirements for many new positions and divisions. The professional profile companies seek to fill is increasingly centered on these skills.

In a few decades, “develop your soft skills” went from generic advice to thoughtful counsel. In this article, we’ll go over the reasons these skills are in such demand.

We’ll also list the most popular soft skills for employers in 2020. Finally, we’ll discuss some of the metrics available to measure these skills in the workplace.

Soft Skills In Hard Markets

Soft vs Hard Skills: Old School Wisdom

Traditionally, soft skills were considered more as perks than prerequisites. These skills were considered inherently unmeasurable. Hard skills could be trained and measured.

To the first generations of management thinkers, hard skills seemed like a better horse to bet on. Time wound up proving them very wrong.

Hard skills may have been easier to measure, but they also proved more rigid. Specializing in hard skills made workers harder to adapt to new positions.

This would be a crucial shortcoming.

The Age of Disruption

As technological advancements have continued relentlessly, many markets were deeply disrupted. Whole industries rose out of seemingly nowhere.

Many roles and departments that are vital today didn’t exist a decade or two ago. Companies struggle to find professionals to perform at a high level in novel fields.

Both market disruptors and well-established companies see their hierarchies affected. Startups and large players have different priorities, but both require soft skills.

Different Priorities

Startups need to hire people that have the hard skills they need at the moment. At the same time, they need employees with the non-technical skills required to handle growth down the road.

Hard skills put food on the table, but it’s soft skills that keep that table getting bigger. Soft skills in your staff mean that a better workplace culture can flourish. This, in turn, leads to companies that grow sustainably, with higher rates of productivity.

Then, there are the big players. Well-established market titans that put too much stock in hard skills become sluggish.

Social and communication skills allow key staff to develop inter-departmental synergy. Understanding the human factor makes it easier for large companies to react to disruption.

Soft Skill Metrics

The key drawback to soft skills is the lack of data to measure their effectiveness in any given situation. Or so the conventional wisdom goes. That statement may have been a fact decades ago, but social sciences have come a long way since then.

Qualitative methodologies have been refined by social psychologists, sociologists, and other experts. Decades of research have developed an ample array of tools to measure non-technical skills. Their accuracy and predictive power are now settled matters in academia.

The ivory towers of academia are far removed from the gritty world of business, though. Distilled techniques in controlled settings are one thing; effective workplace metrics are another. Can these methods be used in a real-world workplace, fruitfully?

The answer is a resounding yes. Here are just a few ways to do it.

Behavioral interviewing

Behavioral interviews focus on the way candidates act in situations. Rather than current or past performance, they use hypotheticals to identify specific skills.

Soft skills-based rubrics

Rubrics are grid-based tools that feature key criteria for employee performance. They allow assessment and scoring on a number of attributes and scales. They should be customized for every role in the company.

Feedback surveys

Questionnaires and surveys can help identify issues stemming from non-technical skill scarcity. Falling levels of employee satisfaction, communication problems and leadership issues are well-captured by questionnaires.

Surveys are also crucial to measure how effective skill training is. Without feedback from colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, and clients it’s impossible to track progress.

Most Valued Soft Skills

Times are changing, especially in the corporate land. As science begins to catch up to the realities of non-technical skills, companies are wising up.

Recruiters now seek and weed out candidates based on their non-technical skills, or lack thereof. The following are the five most in-demand soft skills companies are looking for right now.

5. Emotional Intelligence

Emotional intelligence is the capacity to accurately identify emotions in yourself and others. It is the non-technical skill’s jack-of-all-trades. It works as a bedrock upon which all other skills can be built.

Its presence is insufficient to determine that a candidate is most desirable. Its absence is a red flag, though. Companies need people capable of maturity and empathy.

4. Adaptability

Adaptability is the capacity to change one’s behavior and assumptions in a fast and fluid way. In the age of disruption, adaptability is just what the doctor prescribed. Companies need employees who can adjust to new realities without skipping a beat.

Adaptability doesn’t fall squarely on the shoulders of employees, though. There is a lot that an organization can do (or fail to do) to foster or hinder adaptability.

3. Collaboration

Companies have staked a lot on creating competitiveness between coworkers. It’s collaboration, however, that has proven to be the superior skill.

Companies are built on collaboration. The capacity to cooperate seamlessly in different settings and groups is invaluable to success.

2. Persuasion

Long-considered a skill for the sales team, persuasion has a far wider reach. It’s a crucial element in effective leadership.

Great leaders must be capable of persuading their teams to follow them. Dissent is natural and healthy, but a persuasive leader fosters cohesion.

1. Creativity

Creativity is the most sought-after soft skill in new hires this year. There’s a reason for that. In an uncertain, disrupted marketplace, companies know they’ll need to get innovative to beat the competition.. Creative employees approach problems from new angles, finding clever solutions to vexing puzzles.

This trend is likely to grow more pronounced in the coming years. Technology is taking over most job functions requiring high-level hard skills. Creative employees will allow companies to implement these technologies in new and amazing ways.

Conclusion

Soft skills have reversed the tables on a decades-old narrative. Long-relegated to a minor footnote, these skills are now one of the hottest commodities.

The progress of science allows companies to measure those skills, and analyze them. For companies that have, the verdict is clear—the value of non-technical skills is a hard fact.

Companies that create a culture with soft skills at the center face considerable gains. Those that don’t may well go the way of the dodo.


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Use these tips to maximize your digital recruitment

This is a guest post from Aria Dillinger. Aria graduated with a degree in psychology and has worked as a recruiter for a contact center in the Philippines for four years. She is constantly looking for ways to streamline processes and access larger talent pools, and enjoys writing about her experiences in her spare time.

Company recruitment strategies tend to look for a mix of talent and technical skills. However, preferences for talent and skill differ depending on a company’s current environment, as well as its needs and existing employees.

Skilled individuals can easily step into a certain role, as determined during the recruitment process’ assessments. On the other hand, talented individuals show the potential to learn skills through their behavior and attitude. In the long run, they will be able to adapt to other roles.

The diversity of employing these two kinds of people often results in the best-run organizations. But how can companies amplify their own image to better attract this talent?

HR practitioners and organizations can use technology to streamline recruitment procedures. A lot of work is now done online, and this begins as early as the job hunting process for applicants.

In this regard, companies have to work on building their online presence to make themselves available to the wealth of talent on the lookout for positions to fill.

A bold employer brand, according to Recruitday’s founder Joel Garcia, must be the focus of companies wanting to entice the best candidates. Companies must impress these aspirants before the latter can do the same for them.

How to impress and recruit candidates online

1) Know your demographic and the spaces they frequent

While physical visits to career fairs still occur, much of the research on companies and jobs are now done online. There are many analytics tools companies can use to learn what digital spaces or websites potential applicants frequent when job hunting.

IT company Riverbed has strengthened its presence through ads––both online and offline. These include company events open to the public, such as hackathons and programming and coding competitions. Aside from boosting their brand, they created spaces for networking among prospective hires.

2) Maximize social media

Using new digital media like Instagram takeovers or Facebook live videos have become non-negotiable tools for companies in Asia.

A growing number of businesses have also begun seeing the value of platforms like LinkedIn when it comes to hiring people since a lot of fresh talent has migrated to the region. It’s an easy way for companies to immediately scope out the backgrounds of their potential candidates.

Ayima Asia’s MD Dean Chew explains that operating in Hong Kong has allowed them to “work with some of the most amazing talent in the world, from burgeoning entrepreneurs running startups to established fintech experts.”

They have delivered successful campaigns for other Asian markets of companies big and small on local leading platforms such as Google, Baidu, Facebook, and WeChat. These digital marketing campaigns are effective in that they promote a more transparent recruitment process.

3) Simplify the process

Technology should be optimized to simplify the typically arduous application process. Online applications should have options to upload resumes or sync LinkedIn profiles so as not to turn candidates off or lose their attention from the tediousness that comes with applying.

Having all information uploaded and stored in a single space that can be passed down–should the application pass the initial stages–will be more efficient for all parties.

4) Build your website’s user experience

The user experience online is of prime importance to the modern job seeker. Information on a company has been made so much more accessible online. It’s likely that one of the first things an applicant will check upon seeing a job posting is the company’s website. It should be simple enough to navigate and draw people to careers pages.

Candidates appreciate knowing the company’s culture through employee testimonials, whether through videos or easy-to-digest statements placed on the site. The PeopleFluent Edge has said that turning current employees into brand ambassadors boosts both credibility and appeal as candidates can envision themselves in the company as well.


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Taking Team Dynamics into Account During the Recruitment Process

Hiring often looks simple from the outside. An inside look shows a process complex enough to have thousands of studies dedicated to single aspects of recruitment. Companies spend millions on assessing, training, and hiring the right people to drive their companies, and for good reason. The right people can make or break a business.

People-fit is a crucial topic, and one that many companies don’t spend enough time on. Today, the lens of hiring is slowly shifting to look at aspects such as personality, behavior, and beliefs to create teams that truly work together.

Team dynamics are an incredibly important consideration, because they affect not just how one person works, but how an entire team will get along and work together.

Personality Type

Personality type is the first and one of the most important things to measure. In most cases, you should use personality assessments during initial employee screening. This can include something like Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) or another type of test. Competency and behavioral assessments are important as well, because they indicate what a person can do, why they would or would not do that, and how they do it.

Understanding personality type and behavior is key for determining where someone fits into a team. However, it’s equally crucial to have this information regarding existing team members.

Mapping Team Roles

Mapping team roles allows you to picture what you have in your team and then work to fill gaps. Various tools, typically models and frameworks, exist to help you do this. Look at assessments that can map out roles in successful teams, and the types of people who fit those roles. Your assessment provider should be able to assess multiple roles per individual, as there isn’t a one-size-fits-all for any candidate. That way, you can also keep your teams small with 3-5 people, and at the same time have every role filled (since each individual would be suited for multiple roles).

Cultural Diversity

Cultural diversity is the concept of having a range of influences and background in a team. This allows individuals to influence, challenge, and push each other to excel in ways they wouldn’t on their own. Cultural diversity can be achieved by hiring diverse people, by building cross-functional teams, and by tearing down silos so that teams can work together and be exposed to new ideas, ways of thinking, and approaches.

Cognitive Diversity

Cognitive diversity, like cultural diversity, is about creating teams stemming from different backgrounds, with different thought processes, and different levels of education. This involves understanding how people work, how they use existing knowledge versus creating their own, and whether they tend to use their own expertise or leverage that of others. Strong teams require a mix of cognitive approaches.

Team Compatibility

While it’s important to introduce diversity, you also have to pay attention to compatibility. You don’t want everyone on the team to be the same, but you also don’t want people who will naturally clash. Understanding how different types of people work together (and don’t), will allow you to make better decisions. Diversity for the sake of diversity benefits no one when it means individuals cannot work together.

Strong team are composed of diverse individuals, typically with a range of backgrounds, cultures, and cognitive methods. Most also require a set number of skills such as a specialist, coordinator, and implementer to actually be productive. Understanding each team, who is on that team, and what they need to be most productive will help you to find and fit candidates into those roles to enhance the team.


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What Goes into Quality Employee Screening?

Employee screening functions to ensure only the right candidates make it to interviews. This serves the dual purpose of reducing time and investment spent at later steps and reducing the risk of a wrong hire. Screening can be as simple as a background check or as complex as a multi-pronged behavior, competency, and personality assessments alongside those (mandatory) checks.

In either case, your employee screening will determine who moves into hiring processes. Having quality screening in place will save your organization time and money and will work to ensure you don’t accidentally turn away quality candidates. These steps will help you to set up a quality screening process so your organization can hire the people it needs to succeed.

Conduct and Background

It’s always important to run assessments determining the quality of conduct, previous behavior, previous performance, validity of degrees and qualifications, and so on. This process is standard in most organizations and you likely already have it in place.

Personality and Behavior

Using employee screening to test personality and behavior is a relatively new process, but it can help you to determine if a candidate actually meets your needs. Here, it’s important to have extensive competency frameworks and job profiling in place, so you can pinpoint what is desirable for a role, team, or for future change. Personality and behavior assessment should follow employee screening and results should be linked to individual roles and teams, even if you’re hiring for several comparable roles. This screening can involve:

  • Competency testing
  • Soft-skill testing
  • EQ assessment
  • Personality testing

In most cases, you want to choose one or two of the most relevant assessments to hand to a candidate so that they don’t invest too much time in a role. However, you do want enough information that you can make a quality decision, so the more important the role, the more time the candidate should be willing to invest upfront.

Culture-Fit

Culture-fit tells you if a candidate is likely to fit into an organization and team based on their personality, actual behavior, and how they get along with team members. Some culture-fit can be determined from personality and competency testing. Once a candidate has passed this, they should actually meet your teams.

Here, it’s valuable to host open days at your offices, so prospective candidates can come in, meet each other, and meet teams with no pressure. From there, you can bring final candidates in for single or two-day work assignments in-office to see how things work out.

This will tell you exactly how well everyone will get along, what the individual looks like in a casual as well as a work environment, and how they react to their prospective team-members in person.

Employee screening is your only chance to determine whether a candidate will perform. Today, some 93% of employers in the United States require background checks but fewer check for job-fit, culture-fit, and competency-fit. Doing so will improve the quality of employee screening, will help you to better match individuals to specific roles and teams.


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How to keep up with recruitment in the digital age

In today’s fast-paced, socially connected, and digital world, companies are beginning to realize that technology is key for attracting, assessing, and employing the top talent. Why should you be left behind? These top HR recruitment tips show you how to keep up with recruitment, and your competition, in the digital age.

How has technology changed recruitment

Technology has a funny way of bursting onto the scene and completely changing the way you do things. Over the past ten years, methods of recruitment have evolved to include:

  • Online applications;
  • Advertising on job boards;
  • Searching LinkedIn profiles; and
  • Conducting pre-hire profiling.

And, as HR technology continues to evolve, so do candidate expectations – directly affecting the amount and quality of candidates who apply to your positions. So what can you do to keep ahead?

Keeping up with recruitment in the digital age

Future success in recruitment requires the adoption of a digital hiring model that embraces technology across attraction, selection, and experience.

Attraction

Gone are the days when a newspaper advertisement would result in hundreds of applicants queuing at your offices and gone are the days when a job board advertisement would result in hundreds of applications queuing in your inbox. To keep ahead of your competition, consider adopting:

  • Targeted recruitment ads – ensuring that only relevant applicants see your vacancy;
  • SEO optimized job vacancy pages – increasing your search ranking in Google; and
  • Dynamic branding – attracting the top talent to your company through an engaging and consistent online presence.

Selection

Resumes are dying out – make sure your recruitment campaigns don’t die with them. Your sifting and selecting process needs to change, to ensure that you can handle the increased volume of applications that your new attracting process is generating. A digital selection process incorporates:

  • LinkedIn resumes – it gives you everything you need to know, including the candidate’s professional contacts;
  • Online presence – do an online search for any industry-relevant blogs, social media posts, or following by the candidate; and
  • Predictive analytics – pre-screening profiling, personality testing, and automated selection tools remove hiring bias and accurately assess a candidate’s fit and ability to perform – enabling you to hire the right person to build a top team.

This will reduce the time it takes to find the perfect person for your vacancy.

Experience

The digital age has also changed everyone’s expectations about experiences – preferring speed, ease, and personalization over anything else. Respond to this by using technology to:

  • Streamline the application process with applicant tracking and updating systems;
  • Speed up selection by offering Skype interviews; cutting-edge selection tools, and self-booking interview portals; and
  • Don’t stop once the employee has started – technology should be embraced throughout the onboarding process and beyond.

By doing this, you’ll retain the interest of candidates throughout the recruitment process and come across as a dynamic and happening company that they can’t wait to work for.

Final thoughts

The key to keeping up with recruitment in the digital age is adaptability. In 2001, critics described the iPod as a gimmick – guess what they’re listening to their music on now. Find out about the latest HR technology by following HR blogs and Facebook pages, listening to industry-relevant podcasts, and attending local networking events and organizational development forums. And then, embrace that new technology with open arms because you never know how much you’ll rely on it tomorrow.

Happy recruiting in the digital age!


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Practical Tips For Hiring, Managing (and Retaining) Millennials

This is a guest post from Allison Hail. Allison is a freelance writer from Wellington, the capital of New Zealand. A passionate writer and also a self-confessed foodie who adores devouring ideas from the latest baking recipe books with a steaming cup of coffee. Watch out for her newest articles on Tumblr.

Millennials.  The often misunderstood generation of people aged 20 to 35.

They are the largest generation in the U.S. labor force today. According to a 2017 report by Pew Research Center, millennials make up about 35% of the workforce.

However, they’ve received some less than positive attention since they’ve hit the work scene.

Each generation has its own work values and work ethic. One isn’t better than the other. It’s simply important to understand how each generation performs in the workplace.

It’s vital that HR (and management) personnel understand the motivators of millennials.

Follow these practical tips for hiring, managing (and retaining) millennials.  We will reveal the motivators that will help you maximize productivity, performance and engagement in the workplace.

The Secret to Attracting and Hiring Millennials

Millennials bring a fresh perspective and youthful enthusiasm to the workplace.

But how do you attract the right millennial talent?  During the hiring and interview process, look for the following soft skills:

  1. Leadership skills
  2. Communication skills
  3. Problem-solving & critical thinking
  4. Accountability

This short video explains what to look for in a candidate.

Managing and Retaining Millennials

A 2016 Gallup report of employed millennials revealed that:

  • 21% declared they’ve changed jobs within the past year
  • 60% are open to new job opportunities

This indicates they are the least engaged generation in today’s workforce.

Gallup found only 29% of millennials are behaviorally and emotionally connected to their company and their job.

What can you do to change this?

Engaging Millennials in the Workplace

1  Provide a Sense of Purpose

A mission, purpose and meaningful work is what drives millennials.  Not just a paycheck. Allow them to take the initiative with projects.  Show you value their input.

2  Be a Coach (Like a Boss)

Millennials value a manager who can coach, not command and control.  Someone who helps them understand what’s required of them, and helps them strengthen their skills.  Ensure to provide ongoing feedback and nurture leadership qualities.

3  Support Flexibility

Millennials don’t want to be tied to an 8-hour office schedule.  Their job is their life. They are efficient multi-taskers who expect autonomy and a healthy work-life balance.

How do you put this into action? Begin by engaging millennial candidates during the hiring process.  This will increase your chances of retaining them as employees.

Use our practical tips for hiring, managing (and retaining) millennials to guide you through the process.

Before you know it, you’ll have more engaged, valuable and productive employees.


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5 Out of the Box Ideas to Acquire Talent

This is a guest post from Michael Deane, who is one of the editors of Qeedle, a small business magazine. When not blogging (or working), he can usually be spotted on the track, doing his laps, or with his nose deep in the latest John Grisham.

According to research, 51% of employees are considering a new job. That means that there are plenty of experienced, talented people out there and yet, somehow, you still struggle to find a suitable candidate to fill an open position in your company. It’s not uncommon to see companies with open positions keep posting the same ads over and over again and not being able to find top candidates.

This means that the traditional approaches to hiring talent are not working anymore. If you want to attract only the top-tier, talented candidates, then you need to think outside of the box. It’s time to change your approach and use some innovative recruitment tactics to find the best and the brightest and to convince them to join your company.

Here are some actionable tips you can use to acquire talent.

Attend Various Events and Mingle

Attending various events and conferences is a great way to stay one step ahead in your recruiting game. These events are often filled with great talent and potential candidates so you should start building relationships with them.

These passive candidates who might not be looking for a job could become part of your team someday. Remember the statistics we mentioned earlier? Well, these amazing people are likely to change jobs sooner or later so they might consider your company.

Give Cool Rewards for Referrals

Referrals are very important when it comes to acquiring talent. If you are looking to hire someone, start with your own employees and whom they might know. Often the best candidates come precisely from referrals so throw some cool rewards for the employees who refer a friend of theirs. This will serve as an incentive for them to make an effort and bring more great people to the company.

You can give movie tickets or personalized gifts based on what each employee likes. This shows that you care about your existing employees and will help you acquire future talent.

Focus on Candidate Experience

This might not strike you as out of the box thinking but given the fact that so many companies neglect the importance of candidate experience, it seems that it really is. Positive or negative candidate experience can greatly affect your company. That is why you should pay particular attention to this aspect of the recruitment process if you want to attract talent.

Candidates want to be treated with respect and more than anything else, they want the application process to be simple and interesting. According to research, about 78% of candidates say that the candidate experience they receive is an indicator of how a company values its people.

Plus, bear in mind that candidates talk about their experiences and share them on social media. They leave their good or bad reviews on platforms such as Glassdoor where other potential candidates can see. Given the fact that most candidates first check out the employer reviews online before applying, this is another reason why you should strive to provide a great candidate experience.

How to improve your candidate experience?

Be friendly and honest about your expectations. Instead of a boring job description and requirements, make it simple and inviting. Make the recruitment process fast (no great candidate will wait for a month or more). If you really want to hire someone amazing, don’t waste the candidates’ time. Another company could realize their potential and hire them before you.

Be Creative with Your Job Post

According to the statistics, funny and creative recruitment videos seem to improve your chances of attracting top talent. These videos can make a real difference in the recruiting process. We are visual beings so we respond better to visuals when compared to dry text (in this case job description). Also, videos will account for 82% of all traffic by 2022.

Companies that use recruitment videos saw a 34% higher application rate. Videos are more engaging and allow you to present your company in a creative way that would not be possible with a job description. They also help you attract a wider pool of candidates and appeal to the younger candidates.

Inspire them to submit an application with engaging storytelling. Use the video to show them what it would be like to work in your company. Most importantly, make sure to say or offer something different from what other companies say.

Tailor Your Benefits

Go one step ahead from your competition and ask your potential candidate what kind of benefits would they like. Give them what they want.

It’s becoming harder and harder to attract and retain talented employees. The standard employees’ benefits package is no longer sufficient. You need to step up your game and tailor the benefits to suits the candidates’ needs.

Top pay and retirement savings are essential but many candidates also value flexible working hours and the ability to work remotely. Other important benefits include career development opportunities, wellness benefits, etc.


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How to Promote Your Company Culture to Attract the Right Candidates

This is a guest post from Allison Hail. Allison is a creative writer living in Wellington, New Zealand whose work has been published in various sites. She’s also known for her love of anything related to travel and technology. Discover more of her work here

Your employees are a crucial aspect of your company, but how do you attract the right people to work for you?

Having a great company culture is not only a key aspect of recruiting the right candidates, but also retaining them. Employees nowadays look for certain things in a company, and it’s important to promote your company culture in the right way.

Here are a few ways to promote your company culture to ensure that you attract the right candidates.

Social Media

In our digital age, social media is the perfect place to show off your company culture, and there are infinite ways to do so. Try posting pictures and short videos of your company’s events such as conferences and Christmas parties. A great idea is to have a different employee take over the company’s Instagram or Facebook account each week. This can be at the office, out on volunteer days or even working from home.

Showcasing your company culture can give potential candidates a good understanding of its values. This way, they can see what an average day looks like from the eyes of different people. Be sure to encourage your candidates to follow your social media channels so they can stay up to date with what’s going on.

Your Website

When your candidates are looking for more information about your company, they’re sure to turn to your website. Your website is the first thing they turn to before deciding whether to apply for an interview, so make sure your company culture is reflected here. Communicate your company’s vision and values as a business. Tell your potential employees how you’ll nurture their learning and development. Let them know about the positive environment you’ll provide them too.

You could even include some testimonials from recent hires. Create short videos of existing employees. This is a warm way to connect with potential candidates and gives your website some personality. Friendly and welcoming company culture will be sure to attract the perfect candidates.

Job Postings

Your listing on your company’s career site or a third party site is the first thing a potential candidate sees. Use your job listing as an opportunity to talk about what your company can provide them when they work for you. If your company incorporates flexible working into their culture, communicate this. Candidates like to have the freedom of working from home, especially if they have to look after their little ones during the day.

“Dress-for-your-day” and “work-life balance” are great keywords to use in your job listing, if your company encourages it. Also talk about what other employee benefits your company offers, such as health insurance and company perks, as this is a great way to reflect your company’s culture.

Image Source: Pxhere

In the Interview

If your candidate has made it to this step, there’s no doubt they would have done some research on your company. Nobody likes interviews, but they’re necessary for the recruitment process. Interviews can give your company an understanding of the candidate’s capability and professionalism.

Interviews are also the perfect opportunity to demonstrate your company culture. Structure the interview depending on the style of the business to give your candidate some immediate insight. Involve existing employees in the interview process and allow them to answer some of the candidate’s questions. This makes the entire interview more free-flowing and relaxed. Try to make them excited to work for your company rather than nervous.

Company culture is one of the key things candidates look for in an organisation. Finding the right candidate for your company means they will be genuinely thrilled to work for you. Employees who find themselves in a company with a culture that resonates with them are guaranteed to perform better.


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Implementing Background Checks and Pre-screening into Interviews

Most organizations perform some background checks and pre-screening before individuals walk into their first interview. This is necessary for most and sometimes mandatory. But, how do you use that data to improve the quality of your interview?

In most cases, recruiters can analyze data from background checks and prescreening to ask better questions, get more information, and form a better opinion of who the candidate is.

Perform Comprehensive Pre-Screening

Pre-screening should include background checks, contacting references, and so on. It should also incorporate personality and competency tests to see who the person is, what they can do, and how they will do it.

While not every role will require comprehensive screening, doing so will allow interviewers to create a more comprehensive picture of who a person is before they come into the interview. You should (at the least) test for personality and soft skills such as communication or EQ, which can be delivered in several tests or rolled into one.

Ask Questions Related to Assessments

Most assessments will turn up information that can lead to further questions. Reviewing assessments like answers given by previous employers and background data will allow you to form pointed questions that can help you learn about a candidate. For example:

  • Reference data: “So, we called your previous manager at your last job and he said you’ve had some issues with conflict in his team, what’s your side of that?”
  • Background data: “What convinced you to switch from marketing to finance? Are you happy with that choice?”

Why should you create specific questions around background results? Generic questions based on responses often don’t tell you a lot about an individual, their choices, or why they are in your office. Instead, you’re likely to get very prepared responses. Asking specific questions about data they’ve given you, in line with the information you need, will help you to improve the total result of your interview.

Question Prepared Answers

Candidates now have the tools to prepare for nearly any type of interview, often based on the organization. Having behavior and competency information for a candidate gives you the opportunity to actively question prepared answers based on those assessments.

For example, if a candidate suggests they would respond in a specific way, you can ask how that compares to their test results showing X behavior. This can force an individual to give more honest answers, because they won’t likely have time to prepare for this sort of questioning. Nearly everyone expects they’ll be asked “How would you respond to X situation”, but following their answer with something like, “Your personality profile suggests you prefer to avoid conflict, how do you manage that in a situation like the one we’ve just gone over?” would prompt an answer that hasn’t been prepared for.

Integrating assessment and personality testing into the interview process will give recruiters an easier way to determine who an individual is, how they react, and what they can do. It also allows recruiters to see how well that data matches up to personality shown during interviews, so they can create a bigger picture with more data to make a final assessment.


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The cost of recruitment – are you maximizing your ROI?

Recruitment is costly. Companies spend on average USD$4,000 on attracting and hiring a new employee – $4,000 that could be better spent elsewhere – especially if that new hire turns out to be a new disaster.

Join us, as we take a look at the hidden costs of recruitment, and how you can maximize your return on investment by securing the best talent for your business.

The trust costs of recruitment

No matter whether a long-serving employee has decided to retire or your business is growing fast and requires additional headcount – you know that searching for, attracting, and retaining the top talent is going to be costly. But do you know how costly?

Obvious costs

Recruiting for junior positions, senior roles, and everything in between generates certain predictable costs, including:

  • Print and online advertising;
  • Attending job fairs and networking;
  • Legal fees;
  • New equipment costs; and
  • The final salary.

Hidden costs

What many managers and recruiters fail to take into account, are the hidden costs involved in recruitment, including:

  • Time – anyone’s time spent away from the business sifting candidates, arranging interviews, attending interviews, and onboarding new employees.
  • Performance – any delay in recruiting the right person, will result in a dip in performance for their team, or the costly hourly rate of a temporary worker.
  • Engagement – losing a team member and taking on their workload while you recruit a replacement will impact upon the wider team’s employee engagement – resulting in reduced performance or other notices being handed in.
  • Reputation – while your competition is gossiping about why someone left your company, candidates are also talking about your recruitment process (warts and all).

So, how do you go about reducing these costs and maximizing your return?

Maximizing your recruitment ROI

Ultimately, you want to recruit the top talent in the quickest and cheapest method possible. This requires:

Maximizing your time

Is your time best spent advertising vacancies, sifting through applications, and arranging interviews – or is it better spent elsewhere in the business? If you can generate more profit and business impact than the cost of hiring an external recruitment agency, then it’s time to outsource.

Minimizing the time to hire

Taking a long time to hire no only elongates your recruitment spend, but it also risks losing potential candidates to your competitors. Reduce your time to hire by using automated hiring selection tools to speed up selection and remove bias, becoming DISC personality certified so you can carry out profiling yourself, and creating a recruitment competency framework to streamline your interview questioning.

Attracting the right candidates

Too much time and expense are wasted during the recruitment process on candidates that just don’t fit the position. Change this by attracting the right candidates through clear competency-based job descriptions, by using strong branding that demonstrates your company values, and by pre-screening candidates using background checks and Skype interviews.

Making the right choices

There is nothing more expensive than making a bad hire. Not only do you need to repeat the costs of recruitment and onboarding, but projects are placed on hold, team engagement is further dented, and your morale takes a beating. Make the right hire choice by using employee assessments and job matching data to avoid hiring mistakes and competency-based interview techniques to improve your interviews.

The true cost of recruitment – final thoughts

Recruitment can be costly, but done right, that cost can be returned through increased performance, profits, and engagement. Ensure that you make the right hire by investing in the right branding, assessments, and screening techniques to maximizing your ROI and begin performing at full capacity once again.


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