Category Archives: October 2017

  • 0

What to do if your job description isn’t getting any applicants

The average online job listing receives more than 250 applicants. While half or so are typically irrelevant, most recruiters have an overwhelming number of applicants to choose from. But, what happens when you don’t? If your job description isn’t getting any applicants, chances are that the problem lies in the description, not the job.

By making changes, updating your job description in line with company culture, and ensuring it is formatted in a way that is clear to readers – you will increase your chances of getting qualified applicants.

What to do if you have a lack of applicants

Make Sure It’s Easy to Find

Most applicants search for jobs using keywords and on job boards. If you don’t have an online presence, it’s highly likely that the candidates you want simply aren’t seeing your job. Review the title, make sure that you aren’t using abbreviations, add keywords related to the job title, and make sure it’s listed on places like LinkedIn, Monster, etc.

  • Avoid abbreviations even when they are used in your industry
  • Use terminology the job seeker will use, so generic job roles rather than internal names for the role
  • Make sure it shows up in Google search.
  • Check that your classification on job sites is correct

Review Your Job Description

Your job description is where you communicate what you expect from the candidate and what they have to be good at to do the job. It’s where the candidate decides if the position is right for them, and where they decide whether to apply or not. Some of the most common mistakes are including too much detail, not saying enough, and saying it in the wrong way.

  • Clearly outline the job role. No one is going to go through a long application process without knowing exactly what they will be doing.
  • Return to your job profile and ensure that it’s accurate
  • Make it about the applicant. Integrate company culture, the job role, and the job description while writing to the candidate. What does that look like?

Ready for a challenge? As a junior controller at XYZ company, you’ll handle accounting operations for an up and coming leader in IT technology. Our startup team launched in 2014, and now deliver solutions across the globe. If you’re ready to contribute to a fast-paced team, with 60% growth year over year since launch, apply now.

  • Review the grammar and spelling. Not everyone is a good writer, but there are plenty of tools online (ie. Grammarly) that will help you polish your writing so that your job posting looks as professional as possible.
  • Include specifics like salary range, expected work hours, and location.

Review Your Requirements

Most of the time, it’s difficult to decide exactly what job requirements to look for. However, it is important. If you put something like “Ph.D. preferred” you might have Masters candidates with years of job experience turning away from the role because they believe they won’t be accepted unless they have the higher degree.

Review your competency models to determine what factors you’re really looking for and write your job description accordingly. If you need a requirement, list it, if you don’t, skip it. You can always ask about preferred qualifications during the interview, which will help you avoid scaring any qualified candidates away.

Most of the time, hiring is an investment. If you spend the time and money finding and choosing the right candidate now, chances are they will remain part of the company for years to come. Taking the time to craft a job description based around your company culture and competency model will pay off in the long run.


  • 0

Tools to create an accurate job description

Struggling to find a place to start when writing a job posting? It can be hard to know exactly what a position will require, and you need to frame the job in a way that is honest and attractive to potential candidates. This article will go over what you need to create that accurate job posting.

Tools for an accurate job description

Descriptions from different perspectives

In order to create a holistic job description, you must approach the position from different perspectives. How a supervisor views the role is different from how a colleague or assistant would view it.

Ideally, you would be able to get (in writing) an overview of the position from…

  • Someone who held the position previously
  • The department head the position is under
  • The immediate coworkers of the position

Google Docs

Once you have feedback on the position from key team members, draft the job description in Google Docs.

Google Docs allows you to share collaborative documents across your team. That means you can comment, add to, or delete information from the document in real-time and communicate with others on there. They also provide a “suggesting” mode wherein your edits turn into suggestions for other collaborators to approve or reject.

This will help you put together a job description with the help and easy input from your team. It makes it quick and simple for them to add suggestions or comments, ask questions if things are unclear, and so on.

Job fit assessments

Finally, job matching tools from credited providers can help identify the primary and secondary skills someone needs to succeed at a role. These will be vital to get an accurate portrayal of the required and recommended skills section. If you are able to assess someone who was good at the role, you can benchmark their strengths and weaknesses to use in your job posting as well.


  • 0

Does your job description suck? Here’s how to tell

How do you know if your job description could use some work? If you’re getting the wrong kind of applicants, or none of the candidates are working out for you, you may want to re-evaluate how you put together your job description.

Your job description sucks if…

It doesn’t get in front of the right candidate

If you’re constantly getting applicants who are a bad fit, who don’t meet your requirements, or who can’t do the job well, your job description probably sucks. Your job description won’t carry any weight if it isn’t written to get in front of the right candidate, so pay attention to the key words you use and where you post it. Treat your ideal candidate like your target audience and research where they hang out (where they find jobs), and what language appeals to them.

It doesn’t explain the job

If your job description is vague or misleading, you’ll either confuse your applicants or get the wrong kind of applicants. Your job description needs to clearly detail the job and requirements for it. If someone can’t tell whether they would be a good fit or not from your job description, you need to rework it so that it’ll stand out to your ideal candidate.

It’s all about you

Hiring is a two-way street. If you make your job description all about your company and needs, you could turn away candidates who are also after personal growth (which are the ones you want!). Highlight the benefits of the job for the employee, such as paid vacation, learning and development opportunities, and other perks you offer to incentivize people to apply (and stay).

It’s too demanding

Don’t intimidate great applicants by listing your “nice-to-haves” as “must-haves.” A perfectly good candidate might get discouraged from applying do to your unrealistic expectations, and then you would have missed out on a perfectly good fit.

How do you determine what a good, bad, or ugly job description is?


  • 0

Action plan for using competency-based HR in your business

Creating a competency framework can increase performance at an organizational level – as employees are hired based on competencies. However, pushing adoption of a competency framework can be challenging, especially in organizations that are resistant to change, or where managers fear restructuring.

Action plan for using competency-based HR in your business

Define Relevant Competencies

Many organizations start out with pre-defined competencies which must be customized to the company and to individual roles. Taking the time to define these competencies and the reasons behind them is the first step in fostering adoption and an improved hiring and evaluation process.

Organizational Competencies – Some competencies are required across the organization. For example, trustworthiness, agility, knowledge, competence, etc.

Personal Competencies – Some roles require very specific competencies. For example, an employee working in customer service must exhibit vastly different characteristics than someone working in IT. Defining specific competencies for management and skill leaders creates a framework for rewarding positive traits and behavior, developing a succession pipeline for leadership, and for rewarding experts.

Define How to Use Competencies

Recruiters and interviewers should know what to ask, what to look for, and why. They should be able to pick out desirable behaviors on a resume and should know what to ask in-interview to prompt candidates to reveal their behaviors.

Management should also have the tools to use competencies. They should know which behaviors foster competence and performance and which do not. They should have the ability to reward positive behaviors and to take initiative to offer training and development to those who show promise.

Identify Skill Gaps

Every organization will have competency gaps inside their own organization. Here are a few ways to identify them before they become a bigger problem.

  • Conduct a performance review on a team and individual level
  • Identify behaviors each person should display in their role
  • Highlight which competences missing and identify which can be learned and which cannot
  • Allocate resources to save costs and time when closing gaps by choosing to restructure or train employees where necessary

Identifying and closing gaps requires that managers have a clear understanding of organizational and role competencies and why they matter, so you must get management onboard.

Foster Incorporation and Engagement

Hiring and evaluating employees based on a competency framework means pushing adoption and buy-in from every member of the management and recruiting team. They should understand why the framework was developed and how they should use it – as well as how it will be updated and how they can change it to meet individual circumstances.

  • Connect competencies to business objectives
  • Connect competencies to personal growth and success – not just to business performance
  • Ensure that policies reward the behavior and competencies you want to see
  • Offer coaching and training where needed
  • Communicate and be open and honest about the whole process
  • Ensure that managers and employees understand how data is collected and why
  • Create a privacy standard for behavioral evaluation

The biggest challenge for using competency-based HR is adoption. However, once the competency framework is adopted throughout the organization – it will generate a culture of competence critical to the organization’s success.


  • 0

Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric (Manila)

Please join us on October 26 in Manila for a public seminar on Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric. Learn about the landscape of some fundamental HR practices in the future of jobs.

The key to organizational stability and greater success is adaptability and flexibility. In line with this, the ability to attract, retain and develop people within the organization is primordial to its survival, longevity, and success. Google is one organization that espouses this sentiment, “Hiring key people is the best thing you can do for your organization.” In this half-day program, you will gain more information on how to hire, retain and develop people in this disruptive world.

Register Now

Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric (Manila)

Course Outline

  • Best Practices (Workshop)
  • Before and Now of Hiring Practices
  • Practices Around the World (Based on the Deloitte Report)
  • Where Are We Now?
  • Interview Review (Workshop)
  • Videos

The investment for this course is P999 plus VAT.

Register Now

About the Facilitator

Ruby Mañalac is at present working for PROFILES ASIA PACIFIC/PEOPLE DYNAMICS, INC. as Director for the development of a distributor network for GENOS, a new Emotional Intelligence assessment introduced last November. Previously she occupied the position of Director for Operations and Marketing.

She has been with Profiles on and off since 1999 and has worked with various other organizations mostly in the field of Sales, Marketing, Communications and Training holding positions with Arc Docendi (Marketing Communications Strategist), Globaltronics (Corporate Marketing and Sales Director), Manila Standard (Circulation Manager) and Manila Bulletin (Assistant Display Ads Manager/Writer/Section Editor).

Further, she has also held positions in the USA in the field of Sales, Marketing and Business and People Development such as Group Manager, Sales and Business Development Supreme Health Systems; Business Development with Exquisite Home Products both in (New York) and (New Jersey, USA).

For both companies, she was multi awarded in the field of sales and people development and was awarded as the TOP ROOKIE Presidents Award in NY and NJ. Ruby believes in working strategically with alliances and being open to new learnings. She also greatly adheres to the importance of the human factor in any given situation.

She is a graduate of AB Major in Communication Arts in UST, a Certificate holder in Human Resources Planning and Acquisition in the University of Makati under PMAP and recently acquired the GENOS Emotional Intelligence Certification as an EI practitioner. And she has also received numerous trainings both here and abroad, specifically, with two training events with Profiles International in Texas as well as a Visionary training event in Memphis under Supreme Health Systems.


  • -

How to put together an A-team with competency framework

A competency framework is a structure you can use to define the behaviors, skills, and characteristics (competencies) necessary for employees to perform well in their role. This can be advantageous at every level of recruitment, evaluation, and employee development – enabling you to make choices for hiring, performance evaluation, and employee development that will bring out the best in every team member.

This will, in turn, enable you to develop a highly competent team, capable of adding real value and contributing to organizational performance in a meaningful way.

How to put together an A-team with competency framework

Create the Right Competency Framework

To be effective, a competency framework must be tailored to the company and to the job role depending on whether your organization uses organizational competencies, role level competencies, or both. However, in either case, the framework must reflect the company as it is, and as it is moving forward – so that employees are a good fit for current roles.

This means…

  • Defining behavior that contributes to the success of the role in the current and future environment
  • Defining behavior that contributes to organizational goals in the current and future environment
  • Define hard and soft skills which contribute to success in the current and future environment

If competencies aren’t relevant to the role, the framework is not valuable. Most organizations save time by using a predefined list of competencies – but it is important to customize this to meet specific needs using an outside consultant in combination with internal HR.

Define How to Look for Behaviors

Oral interviews, presentations, assignments, and reference checks are the most common methods of looking for competencies. For example, interviews, where candidates are expected to share examples of past work and/or answer behavioral questions, are extremely valuable for this purpose.

However, competency frameworks should extend to current employees. You should have an effective way to assess, maintain, and monitor the competencies of your existing team. By identifying specific behaviors and skills needed for each role, you can make the best hire, but also identify skill gaps in existing employees and plan for training, which will improve the strength and competency of your team.

Use Your Competency Framework

Once you’ve adopted a competency framework, you must work to ensure that it is incorporated, that recruiters and interviewers are aware of it and of why they should use it, and that implementation is as straightforward as possible.

For example, in the hiring process, creating a list of words and phrases to look out for that exhibit the behaviors you are want would be helpful. Similarly, creating a list of qualities that you no longer find important, such as having a degree from a prestigious university, can also be helpful.

Incorporating a competency framework enables you to build the strength of your current team, while ensuring that new team members brought on display the competencies that enable them to be successful in the role. This, in turn, benefits the organization as a whole.


  • 0

Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric (Cebu)

Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric (Cebu)

Please join us on October 21 in Cebu for a public seminar on Disruptive HR: Shifting from Employer to Employee-Centric. Learn about the landscape of some fundamental HR practices in the future of jobs.

The key to organizational stability and greater success is adaptability and flexibility. In line with this, the ability to attract, retain and develop people within the organization is primordial to its survival, longevity, and success. Google is one organization that espouses this sentiment, “Hiring key people is the best thing you can do for your organization.” In this half-day program, you will gain more information on how to hire, retain and develop people in this disruptive world.

Register Now

Course Outline

  • Best Practices (Workshop)
  • Before and Now of Hiring Practices
  • Practices Around the World (Based on the Deloitte Report)
  • Where Are We Now?
  • Interview Review (Workshop)
  • Videos

The investment for this course is P799 plus VAT.

Register Now

About the Facilitator

Ruby Mañalac is at present working for PROFILES ASIA PACIFIC/PEOPLE DYNAMICS, INC. as Director for the development of a distributor network for GENOS, a new Emotional Intelligence assessment introduced last November. Previously she occupied the position of Director for Operations and Marketing.

She has been with Profiles on and off since 1999 and has worked with various other organizations mostly in the field of Sales, Marketing, Communications and Training holding positions with Arc Docendi (Marketing Communications Strategist), Globaltronics (Corporate Marketing and Sales Director), Manila Standard (Circulation Manager) and Manila Bulletin (Assistant Display Ads Manager/Writer/Section Editor).

Further, she has also held positions in the USA in the field of Sales, Marketing and Business and People Development such as Group Manager, Sales and Business Development Supreme Health Systems; Business Development with Exquisite Home Products both in (New York) and (New Jersey, USA).

For both companies, she was multi awarded in the field of sales and people development and was awarded as the TOP ROOKIE Presidents Award in NY and NJ. Ruby believes in working strategically with alliances and being open to new learnings. She also greatly adheres to the importance of the human factor in any given situation.

She is a graduate of AB Major in Communication Arts in UST, a Certificate holder in Human Resources Planning and Acquisition in the University of Makati under PMAP and recently acquired the GENOS Emotional Intelligence Certification as an EI practitioner. And she has also received numerous trainings both here and abroad, specifically, with two training events with Profiles International in Texas as well as a Visionary training event in Memphis under Supreme Health Systems.


  • 0

What is a competency framework?

A competency framework effectively defines role responsibilities and organisational behaviors. A competency is a set of skills, knowledge, abilities, attributes, experience, personality traits and motivators which has a predictive value towards an individual effectively performing in a job. This article will go over what a competency framework is, where the concept came from, and why to apply it to HR.

What is a competency framework?

What is a Competency Framework?

A competency framework defines competencies that contribute to an individual’s ability to do their job well. This framework can exist at an organizational or individual job level – but enables recruiters to choose specific individuals who are highly suitable for job roles, while giving managers the tools to assess behavior and production, to set goals, and make decisions. Competency frameworks are most often used in recruitment, for evaluations, and for employee development.

Origin of Competency Frameworks

Until the 1970s, most companies believed that success in a job role depended on traditional schooling and intelligence (testing). However, in 1973, David McClelland of Harvard University introduced the concept of ‘competency’ in his paper “Testing for Competence Rather than Intelligence.” Here, McClelland criticized traditional structures that were biased against women and minorities, and only of limited use in determining if someone can do their job well.

By the 1980s, this concept had caught on, and, in 1982, Richard Boyatzis wrote “The Competent Manager: A Model for Effective Performance,” which presented a large-scale study of over 2,000 managers, detailing the behaviors that influenced effectiveness in job roles. This book proved to be influential, and contributed to the increasing adoption of competency frameworks.

What is a Competency?

“Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”  – Albert Einstein

Competencies are behaviors or trait that contribute to a person’s ability to do their job well. Underlying characteristics can predict behavior in a wide variety of tasks and skills, such as a person’s ability to analyze a situation quickly and to perform well under stress. Competencies include characteristics, related knowledge, skills, and attributes, all of which contribute to job performance. For example, a competency frameworks typically answers questions like:

  • What are the expected outputs for the job?
  • What behaviors will lead to the expected outputs?
  • What knowledge, skill, and ability will lead to the expected outputs?

A competency framework can be defined at an organizational level with broad competencies and defined at a role level with specific competencies.

Why Use a Competency Framework?

The business benefit of using a competency framework is quite simply increased performance. A framework outlines the skills and behavioral traits that an employee needs to perform their job well, making it easier to identify the persons who have the correct traits, skills, and behaviors for specific roles.

A good competency framework enables HR to hire the right person for the job based on core behavior traits, in turn increasing hiring accuracy, reducing job turnover, and increasing performance.


Show Buttons
Hide Buttons