Category Archives: March 2018

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Loss of leadership? Here’s how to handle business reorganization

Any business reorganization presents a tough challenge for HR. Employees are left disgruntled and often bitter, new roles must be filled, old employees must work in new ways, and many suffer from demotivation and guilt or anger. These problems are exacerbated when leadership roles are emptied by reorganization, through either restructuring organization, changing teams, or removing old leaders. Employees may be left feeling confused, unproductive, and unmotivated, all of which can dramatically hurt the company.

In fact, one study showed that 74% of employees who maintained their roles through restructuring were demotivated afterwards. Managing a business reorganization and keeping everyone on track means recognizing these issues and working to correct them by reestablishing trust in leadership.

Recognize Problems

Employees who stay on after a reorganization feel sad and even guilty. They may have lost friends, leaders, and people they worked with for years. They may be anxious about their future role, changing roles in the company, and even the future of the company. Recognize this, and act accordingly.

As a result, many employees are left feeling unconfident and unmotivated. To balance, try offering resources to help employees deal with the transition and to boost their confidence, even when they’ve lost trusted leaders. Consider training, classes, seminars, or projects that will get employees excited about working there, offer opportunities, and help everyone understand the value they bring to the table so that they are self-motivated.

You’ll also likely have gaps. Take the time to assess missing skills, equipment, and resources before moving forward.

Offer Opportunities

Restructuring is about moving on. Use it to offer opportunities, like stretch assignments, training, and the ability to take on new and bigger tasks. Even if restructuring is part of a sale, it can be used as an opportunity to allow existing employees to move up or across so that they feel the restructure benefits them. This is especially important when changing how teams work because it gives workers something to grow into.

Empower Employees

Building personal leadership and helping employees to take initiative and lead themselves is often a big step for improving productivity and the quality of the workforce. Spend time helping individuals to adapt and to gain confidence in new roles. Reorganization needs to be about employees, and that means communicating upfront, treating people with respect and dignity, offering opportunities to help those being let go to find new job opportunities, and so on.

Getting Restructuring Right

A good reorganization should involve considerable planning, needs and gap analysis, and training for employees. Consolidating roles, removing teams, and changing how work is completed changes infrastructure and leadership completely – you need to know when and why it is happening so that you can communicate to the people it affects.

Modern companies restructure completely as they change direction, move to meet changing technologies, and adjust for targets. Your workforce should be driven, self-motivated, and capable of personal leadership to help you meet these challenges – so that your company remains productive and motivated throughout changes.

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Job Evaluation: Creating an Efficient Pay Structure

Join us on March 22 to 23 for a 2-day seminar on Job Evaluation: Creating an Efficient Pay Structure. This course orients the participants on how to perform job analysis, with the end in view of crafting a competency-based job description. It follows a workshop style where participants will be conducting job interviews and eventually, writing the corresponding competency-based job descriptions.

Register Now

How employees perceive a fair and equitable workplace is important.  It is important that employees understand the process for determining pay and promotional opportunities.

Job evaluation helps create an efficient pay system.  It is a systematic way of determining value/worth of a job in relation to other jobs in organization to establish a rational pay structure.

It involves assessment of the relative worth of various jobs through factual information about the jobs concerned on the basis of a consistent set of job and personal factors, such as qualifications and skills required.

Essentially Job Evaluation aims to increase employee satisfaction and engagement through an equitable and efficient compensation system.

Course Outline

  • What Is Job Evaluation?
  • Features of Job Evaluation
  • Purpose of Job Evaluation
  • When is Job Evaluation Done?
  • Job Evaluation Committee
  • Job Evaluation Requests
  • Benefits of Job Evaluation
  • Compensation Management: Addressing Equity Issues
  • The Job Evaluation Process
  • Factors Considered in Job Evaluation
  • Methods for Evaluating Jobs
  • Ranking Method (Steps in job ranking; Sample of Ranking;  Merits and Demerits of of Ranking Method)
  • Job Classification (Sample of Job Classification)
  • Point Method (Designing a Point Plan;  Steps in Point Method)
  • Hay Method (Hay System Factors)
  • Job Structure: Relative Value of Jobs
  • Job Evaluation
  • Pay Structure: Putting It All Together
  • Pay Rates
  • Pay grades
  • Pay Ranges
  • Job Evaluation Form
  • Job Evaluation Sample

The investment for this course is P7,000 plus VAT.

Register Now

About the Facilitator

Dr. Maria Vida G. Caparas is a Wiley-Certified Everything DISC Trainer and a licensed Psychologist.  She graduated Summa Cum Laude in her Ph.D. Psychology at UST.  She also obtained a Diploma in Public Management from UP Diliman as a government scholar.

Dr. Caparas is an Accredited Trainer of the Philippine Government with extensive and invaluable services in both government and corporate offices. She served as Vice President of HR in New San Jose Builders, Inc. In GMA Network, Inc., she wrote for Kapuso Magazine as Managing Editor. She also became the Dean of the Graduate School at the Manila Central University.

Currently, aside from serving as a Consultant for Profiles Asia Pacific, Inc., she teaches part-time in UST and De La Salle University.  She has authored four books in Psychology and Human Resource Management. Already a fulfilled academician and HR and OD practitioner, she has received a number of awards and recognition.

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