Category Archives: Employee Retention

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How regular workforce analysis can help avoid headaches

Workforce analysis is the process of analyzing your employees and their capabilities to understand current abilities, future needs, and existing gaps. While the immediate benefits of an improved hiring process might be enough to convince you to use analysis as part of your HR process, there are plenty of ways regular workforce analysis benefits you in the long-term.

Good analysis will help you to identify the quantity and quality of employees you need for each task, identify knowledge, skills, and experience that are needed, missing, or soon to be needed. It will allow you to identify changing trends and skills so that you can begin to adapt your existing workforce, and will help you to remain prepared as your workforce changes.

Benefits of regular workforce analysis

Here’s how periodic analysis helps you and reduces business headaches along the way:

Reduced Turnover

Workforce analysis allows you to identify gaps and changing skills needs, making it possible for you to offer on-the-job training to high-performing employees so that they have the opportunity to move up in the company, and you have the opportunity to retain employees with valuable behaviors.

Good analysis will also help you to identify which employees are crucial and difficult or costly to replace, so that you can work to retain those employees, or work to train replacements internally.

Reduced Skills Gaps

Technology evolves at a rapid pace and many employees have skills which are obsolete. Some roles are staffed by someone who no longer fills many of the obligations they were originally hired for, because those obligations no longer exist, while others are short-handed and lack valuable skills. A workforce analysis can help you to begin restructuring to fill gaps, reduce inefficient labor, and ensure that all roles have are held by employees with the technical and behavioral skill to make the most of them.

Preparing for Change

Most industries are in a constant state of change and you may find that teams, departments, output, and technology change every few years. Workforce analysis can help you to recognize where change will happen so that you can begin preparing employees and company structure in advance. This will help you to avoid delays and disruptions when change does happen.

Preventing Unexpected Shortages

If you know when employees are likely to leave or want to move up, you can prepare for it by either having a new employee ready to fill their shoes or offering incentive to remain with the company. For example, by checking when employees typically retire, comparing average length of employment in specific positions, and checking employee satisfaction, you can easily calculate when you are likely to have employment gaps and prepare for it.

Good workforce analysis will help you stay on top of every aspect of your workforce planning and management, from hiring to offering continuing education and advancement opportunities for existing employees. It will also allow you to address issues before they become problems, take steps to ensure that employees are happy and willing to stay, and allows you to adapt your workforce to meet new technologies before they arrive.

This will help you to reduce problems, give you more control over workforce changes, and can be a competitive advantage.

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5 ways to demonstrate positive engagement on your team

Positive engagement is crucial to driving workforce productivity, reducing turnover, and ensuring adoption of new practices and tools. Having an engaged workforce is an important goal for any HR team, and a crucial element of modern management.

Demonstrating engagement means taking active steps to show that you care about employee well-being and engagement, on an individual level.

How to demonstrate positive engagement

Facilitate Good Communication

Clear and transparent communication between leadership and employees facilitates trust, understanding, and commitment. This means making clear goals linked to daily work, without HR terms and jargon. You need to communicate goals in ways that employees can see what is happening, and how it’s making a difference.

At the same time, creating open channels for real day-to-day communication is equally as important. Any member of a team must feel able and willing to come forward to discuss worries, problems, and obstacles with management, without fear or reprisal.

Offer Compensation and Recognition

Employees who feel respected and recognized for their efforts are more likely to continue to put in additional work, to feel motivated, and to remain passionate about their goals and objectives. The Harvard Business Review found that taking time to recognize and reward achievement and initiative can dramatically improve positive engagement. Good recognition involves a combination of personal “thank you’s” and team recognition, as well as compensation and benefits.

Create Room for Opportunities

Most people don’t want to be in the same role in 10 years. Nearly everyone has a career path or objective in mind. Most people also don’t want to work for a company that is stagnating. Focusing on growth (personal and corporate) both demonstrates and facilitates positive engagement while giving individuals room to move upward without leaving the company and moving to another. This boosts engagement because everyone who wants room to grow to can dedicate themselves to a career inside your company.

Develop Trust in Peers and Leadership

Trust is mandatory for any team to work and perform together. But, many teams either don’t trust their leadership or cannot rely on peers to perform well. SHRM found that 75% of employees in the 2015 Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey listed trust as the primary reason for company loyalty and dedication.

Implement better communication, including meetings where everyone can contribute, social media, newsletters, and intranet. In addition, hold each person accountable for individual performance to help increase trust throughout the team.

Hold Leadership Accountable

Management and leaders are responsible for going out and engaging with employees. They are the front line between HR and the workforce and their performance and tactics will make or break employee engagement. Holding those in leadership positions accountable for adopting new practices, engaging with employees, and developing trust boosts engagement, and by up to 67% according to a Gallup poll.

Demonstrating positive engagement in your team means taking initiative and working to make individuals feel that they are valued, important, and recognized. It also means facilitating teamwork and upward growth, ensuring that leaders are performing well in their roles, and creating an environment where teams can trust each other.

Over time, this will boost productivity, reduce employee turnover, and increase the quality of work and of life for employees in your team.

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