Category Archives: Emotional Intelligence

  • 0

The Missing X-Factor In Talent Selection and Management: Emotional Intelligence

Please join us on March 9 for a public seminar on The Missing X-Factor in Talent Selection and Management: Emotional Intelligence. This half-day course is designed for learning and organizational development professionals, human resource consultants, practitioners and managers who are interested to learn more about the GENOS EI Selection and Talent Management Solution.

“HR is not about HR, but about delivering business value. Functional and technical competencies are fundamental in many ways but social competencies are the differentiators that make sure future employees not only know what to do, but how to do it.” – Dave Ulrich

Find out why the GENOS Emotional Intelligence selection assessment can be the missing X-factor in your hiring process, especially for positions requiring people management!

Register Now

Course Outline

  • Features of the GENOS EI Selection Assessment and Report
  • Conducting and scoring the interview
  • Debriefing hiring managers
  • Debriefing new hires using the Self or 180 report
  • Question and Answer

Register Now

About the Facilitator

Ms. Ruby Mañalac currently works as the Director for Marketing and Distributor Networks for Profiles Asia Pacific, Inc., and previously, she was the Director for Operations and Training Manager. She has worked for various organizations mostly in the field of Sales, Marketing, Communications, and Training, not just in the Philippines, but also overseas. She’s recognized for her excellence in the fields that she worked on, gaining various awards like Top Rookie President’s Award in New York and New Jersey, USA.

A graduate of AB major in Communication Arts in UST, her other achievements include a certificate in Human Resources Planning and Acquisition from the University of Makati under PMAP, a certified GENOS Emotional Intelligence Practitioner, and just last August 2017, she flew to Sydney, Australia to get certified at the IGNITE Train the Trainers GENOS Emotional Intelligence Program.

She’s very open to learning, attending training events not just in the Philippines but also abroad. Her advocacy on Emotional Intelligence led her to be interviewed by ANC and CNN Philippines.


  • 0

How to practice emotional intelligence in the workplace

Emotional Intelligence is more and more often seen as a crucial aspect of good leadership and working together, but it can be difficult to recognize and integrate into the workplace. Even more difficult is the concept of communicating to leaders and supervisors that you expect them to show emotional intelligence, because it’s difficult to determine if they’re practicing emotional intelligence without creating guidelines and specific tasks.

Unfortunately, emotional intelligence is about recognizing emotion and using it to guide decisions, behavior, and actions. This means that the actual practice of emotional intelligence can shift considerably depending on the situation. However, you can still create guidelines, which can help you to communicate and gauge practicing emotional intelligence in the workplace.

4 Ways to Practice Emotional Intelligence in the Workplace

1) Be Self Aware

Being self-aware, or aware of your own emotions and their impact on your behavior, is crucial to emotional intelligence. If you respond irrationally to something, you should know why and how to fix it. If someone is aggressive towards you, it is idea if you can recognize how you are likely to react and work to compensate so that you stay calm. Being aware of your own emotions and how you react gives you the ability to judge your strengths and weaknesses, respond better in any situation, and make better decisions by considering how your emotions play into your answer.

A quick way to judge self-awareness is to ask someone to rate their own emotional intelligence, and then compare it to how others rate their EI.

2) Focus on Others

It’s human nature to focus on yourself, but an emotionally intelligent person knows that it’s not all about them. If someone is struggling at work, their problems aren’t all about how much extra work it creates for you.

Shifting focus to other people in conflicts, discussions, meetings, and even everyday conversations allows you to better understand what they mean, their emotions, whether or not they’re stressed, and their motivations.

This will, in turn, give you a better idea of they can handle tasks, if they can take on more work, if they are integrating well, and if they are performing at their best. It also allows leaders to better delegate responsibilities, make decisions based on capabilities, and understand how to motivate and influence others.

3) Reward Others

Understanding emotional responses enables both leaders and colleagues to understand when and how to rewards others for their actions, behavior, and attitude. A reward can be a simple thank you, calling someone out at a meeting to say what a great job they’ve been doing, or a compliment like, “I really like how you handled that”.

Rewarding behavior can help to defuse situations, make employees feel appreciated, and keep people on the right track when they develop behavior that is beneficial to the company.

4) Be Accountable

When you’re accountable for yourself, you display humility, accept when things are your fault or your problem, and respond with understanding by recognizing others’ emotions. Being accountable for others means being transparent about leadership, taking on roles that help others to succeed, and working to develop relationships so that you understand everyone on your team. This will help you to perform better, to get more out of your team, and to build better relationships, which benefits the entire team and organization.

Emotional intelligence is an important part of leadership and team building, and something that is important for both leaders and team members to demonstrate. If you hire based on emotional intelligence, teach emotionally intelligent practices, and encourage people to lead in more emotionally intelligent ways, your business will benefit.


  • 0

Public Seminar: Emotional Intelligence for Today’s Leaders

Please join us this Friday, February 2, for a public seminar on Emotional Intelligence for Today’s Leaders. In this one-day workshop, participants will learn why managers, leaders, and staff behave the way they do. You will discuss the direct impact of emotional intelligence on professional performance, and go over case studies that demonstrate how to improve EI.

The investment for this workshop is P7,900 plus VAT. All participants will receive an EI Self-Assessment with free coaching/reporting, and two raffle winners will receive EI Self-Assessments courtesy of Profiles Asia Pacific.

Register Now

Emotional intelligence and leadership performance

About the Facilitator

Mr. Enrique Pablo O. Caeg or Eric Caeg for short is a Professional Coach (ICF) whose focus is on Business Coaching. Currently, he is a Business and HR Consultant for various companies in the Retail, Food and Manufacturing Industries.

His professional expertise is in the areas of Human Resources, Organizational Development, Sales and Operations and Marketing. From his 20 plus years of working, he has served in various capacities rising from the rank from Junior Marketing Assistant to Sales & Marketing Head, General Manager and as Human Resources Director.

He attended a Diploma Course on Managing and Measuring Corporate Performance, at the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) and another Diploma Course on Retail Excellence, at the Ateneo Graduate School of Business, Center for Continuing Education where he is also a recipient of the Program  Director’s Award. Mr. Eric also has a Master’s degree in Entrepreneurship obtained from the Asian Institute of Management (AIM) in 2001 where he is a recipient of the Guru’s Commendation. He has a Bachelor of Science in Commerce, San Beda College Manila, Major in Marketing and is awarded as one of the Ten Outstanding Marketing Student Award of the Philippine Marketing Association (PMA). In 2016, he became a certified GENOS Emotional Intelligence Practitioner.

His involvement in various professional organizations include being an incoming 2017 Board Member and Director for Government and Consumer Affairs of the Philippine Marketing Association (PMA), a member of the Executive Committee and Deputy Chairman for the Membership Committee, International Coach Federation Philippines (2016-2017), a member of the Philippine Retailers Association, the largest Organization of Retailers in the Philippines, a member of the Association of Filipino Franchisers, Inc., the Leading Organization of the Micro, Small & Medium Enterprises, and in 2005, he was the past president of the Don Bosco Alumni Philippine National Federation (DBAPNF), the umbrella organization of all the Alumni Associations of Don Bosco schools in the Philippines, where he is still a member.

Eric is also an Author for the Black Card Books, an International Publishing Company led by the Best Selling author of the Millionaire Mind, Mr. Gerry Robert.


  • 0

A Lack of Emotional Intelligence Creates Disruption and Dissatisfaction

Leaders who lack emotional intelligence are unable to respond perceptively and with compassion. This can result in leaders and employees who show insensitivity, arrogance, volatility, selfishness, and inflexible thinking.

Consider a situation where an employee experiences a traumatic event, such as a car accident or a breakup and arrives at work late. A leader without emotional intelligence would make them come in anyway, possibly berate them for being late, and create feelings of resentment, while decreasing employee loyalty in exchange for what would most likely be poor performance throughout the day.

A leader with emotional intelligence would ask what was wrong, would offer a solution such as time of or swapping a shift for another, and make it work because they were compassionate and cared about the employee’s wellbeing. They’d lose the employee for the day or week, but when that employee came back, they’d be grateful, they’d feel like they and their health mattered, and would be a lot more productive when they came back to work. This would in turn foster employee loyalty, boost employee satisfaction, and build inter-team trust.

Similarly, having employees with emotional intelligence builds communication, team trust, relationships, and the ability to respond well in potentially negative situations.


  • 0

How emotional intelligence creates more successful businesses

Emotional intelligence, sometimes shortened to EI or EQ, is the ability of individuals to recognize their own and others’ emotions, discern between them, and use that knowledge to guide their thinking, behavior, and actions. The term was first popularized in a 1994 book by Daniel Goleman, “Emotional Intelligence: Why it Can Matter More than IQ“, but the term and the study of the value of using emotions to form behavior and action dates back to a 1964 paper by Michael Beldoch arguing the value of emotional sensitivity in various modes of communication.

Emotional intelligence has a long history, but it’s only recently that business and organizations have begun to see its value. With more modern leadership techniques changing the focus from productivity to individual performance, concepts like emotional intelligence become extremely important.

Direct Impacts on Business Performance

Having leaders and employees who show high emotional intelligence creates a direct business impact by changing how situations are treated, how people respond and disagree, and even how meetings are handled.

Conflict Resolution

Emotional intelligence enables people to see understand the emotions of their counterpart and to judge how to respond appropriately. This, in turn, enables people to handle conflicts without getting angry, can benefit problem solving, and increases instances of compromise between teams and employees in decision making processes.

Employee Satisfaction

When leaders respond with emotional intelligence and compassion, they reward employees for a job well done, recognize top performers, focus on helping others to perform, and respond to personal and emotional problems with compassion and understanding. This creates an environment where employees feel listened to and valued, fosters gratitude and a sense of belonging, and increases employee satisfaction. Over time, it increases productivity while decreasing churn.

Team-building and Trust

When teams know that their colleagues will respond with emotional intelligence, they are more likely to trust each other. A person who knows that his colleague or supervisor will respond with emotional intelligence is more likely to trust that person, and therefore more likely to build a quality working relationship.

Emotional intelligence helps people to work better together, helps leaders to respond well to situations, and improves every level of communication. This will, in turn, improve employee satisfaction, improve leadership, improve communication, and even productivity.


Show Buttons
Hide Buttons